Depression

How do I know if I’m depressed?

Everyone occasionally feels blue or sad, but these feelings are usually fleeting and pass within a couple of days. When a person has a depressive disorder, it interferes with daily life, normal functioning, and causes pain for both the person with the disorder and those who care about him or her. Depression is a common but serious illness, and most who experience it need treatment to get better.

Many people with a depressive illness never seek treatment. But the vast majority, even those with the most severe depression, can get better with treatment. Intensive research into the illness has resulted in the development of medications, psychotherapies, and other methods to treat people with this disabling disorder.

What are the signs and symptoms of depression?

People with depressive illnesses do not all experience the same symptoms. The severity, frequency and duration of symptoms will vary depending on the individual and his or her particular illness.

Symptoms include:

  • Persistent sad, anxious or “empty” feelings
  • Feelings of hopelessness and/or pessimism
  • Feelings of guilt, worthlessness and/or helplessness
  • Irritability, restlessness
  • Loss of interest in activities or hobbies once pleasurable, including sex
  • Fatigue and decreased energy
  • Difficulty concentrating, remembering details and making decisions
  • Insomnia, early–morning wakefulness, or excessive sleeping
  • Overeating, or appetite loss
  • Thoughts of suicide, suicide attempts
  • Persistent aches or pains, headaches, cramps or digestive problems that do not ease even with treatment.

How can I help myself if I am depressed?

If you have depression, you may feel exhausted, helpless and hopeless. It may be extremely difficult to take any action to help yourself. But it is important to realize that these feelings are part of the depression and do not accurately reflect actual circumstances. As you begin to recognize your depression and begin treatment, negative thinking will fade.

To help yourself:

Try to spend time with other people and confide in a trusted friend or relative. Try not to isolate yourself, and let others help you.

Expect your mood to improve gradually, not immediately. Do not expect to suddenly “snap out of” your depression. Often during treatment for depression, sleep and appetite will begin to improve before your depressed mood lifts.

Postpone important decisions, such as getting married or divorced or changing jobs, until you feel better. Discuss decisions with others who know you well and have a more objective view of your situation.

Remember that positive thinking will replace negative thoughts as your depression responds to treatment.

Engage in mild activity or exercise. Go to a movie, a ballgame, or another event or activity that you once enjoyed. Participate in religious, social or other activities.

Set realistic goals for yourself.

Break up large tasks into small ones, set some priorities and do what you can as you can.

Seek help from a qualified professional counselor.

Late Life Depression
Depression is Not a Normal Part of Growing Older

Depression is a true and treatable medical condition, not a normal part of aging. However older adults are at an increased risk for experiencing depression. If you are concerned about a loved one, offer to go with him or her to see a health care provider to be diagnosed and treated.

Depression is not just having “the blues” or the emotions we feel when grieving the loss of a loved one. It is a true medical condition that is treatable, like diabetes or hypertension.

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My office is centrally located in West Linn, just off of 205, and easily accessible to residents of Wilsonville, Canby, Oregon City, Tualatin, Lake Oswego, Lake Grove, Happy Valley, Gladstone.  I belong to Family counselors of west linn or

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Natalie Mills, LPC, MFT

Marriage and Family Therapist

503-882-6237


In the Historic Willamette Village
2066 Doral Ct.
West Linn, OR 97068

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What is Chrysalis?

A transitional stage through which a caterpillar becomes a butterfly. During the chrysalis phases of our life, little may appear to be happening because much of the change is occurring internally, beneath the surface.


These transitions involve shifts in the way we see the world. A chrysalis stage is a time when the former way of being is no longer possible and a new “Self” has not yet emerged. This is a time of exploration, questioning, and discovery.

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Your City

My office is centrally located in West Linn, just off of 205, and easily accessible to residents of Wilsonville, Canby, Oregon City, Tualatin, Lake Oswego, Lake Grove, Happy Valley, Gladstone.

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